History and Citizenship Education, Secondary III

Print section

The change of empire

In North America, the change of empire marked the end of a war between the European powers. France’s defeat in the Seven Years’ War led to the cession of New France to Great Britain, which sought to control its new subjects. The British authorities, however, had to make some concessions to the Canadiens. Some of the British subjects who had recently settled in the Province of Quebec and those who had arrived from other colonies were discontented. The change of empire caused major social, economic, political and territorial changes in the colony in the St. Lawrence Valley. The designated focus for the study of the social phenomenon The change of empire is The consequences of the Conquest for the organization of the society and the territory.

The concepts prescribed by the program are not explained by means of specific statements. It is through the appropriate use of knowledge related to the social phenomenon studied that students develop their understanding of the following concepts: Conquest, economy, education, issue, language, Loyalists, power, religion, right, society, territory.

The table below shows how some historical knowledge has been reorganized.

Program

Reorganization Progression of learning
  • Economic activities
This element of knowledge is addressed in Section 2.3. and considered in detail in Secondary IV.

Secondary III:
The change of empire

  • 2.3. Colonial economy

Secondary IV:
Economy and development
British rule

  • 1. Economy based on fur
  • 2. Economy based on timber
  • 3. Agriculture
  • Migration flows
This element of knowledge has been moved to Secondary IV.

Secondary IV:
Population and settlement
British rule

  • 2. Migration flows
  • Organization and occupation of the territory
The element of knowledge “Occupation of the territory” has been moved to Secondary IV.

Secondary IV:
Population and settlement
British rule

  • 2. Migration flows
  • 3. Effects of migration flows
    • 3.2. Effects on the territory
  • Relations with the Native peoples
This element of knowledge has been moved to Secondary IV.

Secondary IV:
Official power and countervailing powers
British rule

  1. Power relations between the Native peoples and the British authorities

Student constructs knowledge with teacher guidance.

Student applies knowledge by the end of the school year.

 

Student reinvests knowledge.

Year
3 4
  1. The dualism of public institutions in Québec today
    1. Indicates aspects of the dualism of some public institutions (e.g. language, religion)
 
    1. Names institutions in which cultural or linguistic dualism is expressed (e.g. school boards, civil law, the media)
 
  1. The change of empire
  • 2.1.   Military government
    1. Names the type of government established in the colony after the capitulation of Montréal:  military government
 
    1. Identifies the administrators of the colony after the capitulation of Montréal: generals, such as Jeffery Amherst and James Murray
 
    1. Gives the reason for the establishment of a military government: the war between France and Great Britain was not over in Europe
 
    1. Indicates measures imposed on the Canadiens during the period of military government: forfeiture of arms, obligation to sell land only to the British, obligation to swear an oath of allegiance and loyalty to the king
 
    1. Indicates the immediate effects of the military government on the colony’s economy: the arrival of adventurers interested in exploiting resources, the arrival of British merchants
 
    1. Indicates the reason for the end of military government: the Treaty of Paris
 
  • 2.2.   Political organization of the Province of Quebec
    1. Indicates the boundaries of the Province of Quebec after the Royal Proclamation
 
    1. Identifies the administrators of the Province of Quebec after the Royal Proclamation and after the Québec Act: governors, such as James Murray and Guy Carleton, councillors
 
    1. Indicates the main measures stipulated in the Instructions to governor Murray: establishment of a legislative assembly as soon as possible, introduction of British civil and criminal law, requirement to comply with the Test Act in order to hold public office
 
    1. Indicates the main concessions made to the Canadiens by the first governors following the Instructions: maintenance of French civil law,  the appointment of British councillors favourable to the Canadiens
 
    1. Indicates the boundaries of the Province of Quebec after the Québec Act
 
    1. Indicates effects of the Québec Act on the Province of Quebec (e.g. abolition of the Test Act oath, appointment of Canadiens to the council, American invasion)
 
  • 2.3.  Colonial economy
    1. Names the main economic activities in the Province of Quebec: the fur trade, agriculture, fishing
 
    1. Identifies the group that gained control of the fur trade after the Conquest: British merchants
 
    1. Names the main export product and the main market: furs; Great Britain
 
  • 2.4.   Effects of the American Revolution on the Province of Quebec
    1. Indicates the boundaries of the territory of the Province of Quebec and the United States after the Treaty of Paris (1783)
 
    1. Indicates the effect of the Treaty of Paris (1783) on the territory of the Province of Quebec: loss of the region south of the Great Lakes
 
    1. Indicates the main effect of the American Revolution on the fur trade: displacement of the fur trade to the northwest
 
    1. Indicates the main effect of the American Revolution on the composition of the population in the Province of Quebec: presence of Loyalists
 
  1. Differences, interests and coexistence in Québec today
    1. Identifies players in the debate about dualism (e.g. political organizations, the media)
 
    1. Indicates the positions of players in the debate about dualism (e.g. primacy of the French language, access to education in English)
 
    1. Indicates interests of the players who express views about dualism: defence of values, principles and beliefs
 

Haut de page