History and Citizenship Education (Cycle One)

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Winning of civil rights and freedoms

Civil rights and freedoms are the foundation of democratic states. Despite their universal nature, recognized by the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, these rights and freedoms are not enjoyed equally by all. There have been many calls in the 20th century to have these rights and freedoms recognized for all human beings, without distinction as to sex or ethnic origin.

The struggle for civil rights and freedoms has taken different forms in different contexts. Three contexts are proposed for study: the feminist movement, the struggle against institutional racism and the decolonization movement. Students must study one of these three contexts.

The concepts prescribed by the program are not described using specific statements. It is by using all of the knowledge related to a social phenomenon that students develop their understanding of the following concepts: censorship, democratization, discrimination, dissidence, rights, equality, freedom, repression and segregation.

Student constructs knowledge with teacher guidance.

Student applies knowledge by the end of the school year.

 

Student reinvests knowledge.

year
1 2
  1. Civil rights and freedoms today: denial, struggle and recognition
    1. Lists civil rights and freedoms (e.g. the right to vote, the right to justice, equality before the law, freedom of expression, freedom of religion)
 
    1. Indicates situations in which governments may limit or suspend civil rights and freedoms (e.g. government decision in case of war, a crisis or a perceived threat to national security)
 
    1. Indicates current situations in which civil rights and freedoms are ignored (e.g. exploitation of children, sex trafficking, countries under dictatorship)
 
  1. Recognition of civil rights and freedoms and impact on societies of the winning of civil rights and freedoms
  • 2.1.   Location in space and time
    1. Locates on a time line events related to the feminist movement (e.g. winning the right to vote in several countries; publication of The Second Sex, by Simone de Beauvoir; the founding of the National Organization for Women)
 
or
    1. Locates on a time line events related to the Black civil rights movement in the United States and South Africa (e.g. Martin Luther King’s speech at the Lincoln Memorial, Civil Rights Act, abolition of Apartheid)
 
or
    1. Locates on a time line events related to decolonization in Asia and Africa (e.g. independence of India and Pakistan; Bandung Conference; independence of Algeria)
 
  • 2.2.    Feminist movement
    1. States some of the rights in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights on which feminist movements are based (e.g. principle that there must be no discrimination based on sex in the application of rights)
 
    1. Indicates wrongs suffered by women in the West in the first half of the 20th century (e.g. discrimination, segregation, limited powers)
 
    1. Names figures associated with the feminist movement (e.g. Simone de Beauvoir, Betty Friedan,  suffragettes)
 
    1. IIndicates actions taken by feminists or women’s groups in the 20th century (e.g. demonstrations, publication of books and manifestos)
 
    1. Indicates reactions to the feminist movement (e.g. repression, creation of associations opposed to the recognition of civil rights for women)
 
    1. Indicates gains made by feminist movements in the West (e.g. right to vote, access to higher education)
 
or
  • 2.2.   Struggle against racism
    1. States some of the rights in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights on which anti-racism movements are based (e.g. principle that all human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights)
 
    1. Indicates wrongs suffered by Blacks in the United States in the first half of the 20th century and in South Africa before the abolition of Apartheid (e.g. discrimination, segregation, denial of civil rights)
 
    1. Names figures associated with the struggle against racial segregation (e.g. Rosa Parks, Martin Luther King, Nelson Mandela)
 
    1. Indicates actions taken by citizens or states to fight against racism in the 20th century (e.g. passive resistance, demonstrations, riots)
 
    1. Indicates reactions to movements for the recognition of freedoms and civil rights (e.g. repression, imprisonment)
 
    1. Indicates gains made by Blacks, particularly in the United States and South Africa (e.g. Civil Rights Act, Voting Rights Act, abolition of Apartheid)
 
or
  • 2.2.   Decolonization movement
    1. States some of the principles in the Charter of the United Nations on which groups opposed to colonialism base themselves (e.g. principle of equal rights and self-determination of peoples)
 
    1. Indicates wrongs suffered by colonized populations (e.g. discrimination, segregation, lack of economic control, imposition of a foreign culture)
 
    1. Names actors associated with decolonization (e.g. Gandhi, Senghor, United Nations)
 
    1. Indicates actions taken by those opposed to colonialism (e.g. boycotts, passive resistance, riots, wars)
 
    1. Indicates reactions to the decolonization movement (e.g. repression, wars)
 
    1. Indicates gains made by populations that have fought against colonialism (e.g. independence of numerous states in Asia and Africa)
 
  1. Responsibilities of individual in the struggle for and recognition of civil rights and freedoms today
    1. Names organizations that fight for civil rights and freedoms (e.g. Amnesty International, Human Rights Watch, SOS Racisme)
 
    1. Indicates actions that illustrate the exercise of fundamental rights (e.g. demonstrations, elections, petitions, open letters)
 
    1. Gives examples of actions taken by organizations to promote the recognition of civil rights and freedoms (e.g. denunciations, boycotts, publications)
 

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