Geography (Cycle One)

Print section

Regional territory

Tourist regions
Forest regions
Energy-producing regions

A regional territory is organized around the exploitation of a resource. Four types of regional territories are studied: tourist regions, forest regions, energy-producing regions and industrial regions. Studying these regions makes it possible to understand how a territory is organized around economic activity.

D.  Industrial regions

An industrial region is organized around production, distribution and service enterprises. It contributes to an area’s economic development. Production activities associated with an industrial region have an impact on the environment. Because this type of territory is part of a global economic context that is characterized by the relocation of industries, it is important for industrial regions to maintain their place in the global context.

The study of one of the two industrial regions suggested in the program is compulsory. Teachers may choose between the American and Canadian Great Lakes region and an industrial region of Québec. Cycle teams may determine in which year the industrial region will be studied .

The concepts prescribed by the program are not described using specific statements. It is by using all of the knowledge related to a territory that students develop their understanding of the following concepts: planning and development, commercialization, concentration, relocation, development, industrialization, globalization, multinational, workshop country and resource.

  1. KNOWLEDGE RELATED TO INDUSTRIAL REGIONS
Year

Student constructs knowledge with teacher guidance.

Student applies knowledge by the end of the school year.

 

Student reinvests knowledge.

1 ou 2
  1. Location of an industrial region
    1. Locates the industrial region studied in the appropriate continent and country
    1. Locates major industrial regions on a map of the world (e.g. American and Canadian Great Lakes region, southern Hokkaido in Japan, southeastern United Kingdom, São Paulo region in Brazil, Alexandria in Egypt)
  1. Characteristics of an industrial region
    1. Lists types industries found in the industrial region studied (e.g. aluminum smelters in Saguenay − Lac-Saint-Jean, steel mills and vehicle assembly plants in the American and Canadian Great Lakes region)
    1. Names the main industrial clusters of the region studied (e.g. Pittsburgh, Detroit, Kingston in the American and Canadian Great Lakes region)
    1. Indicates natural factors that have contributed to the development of the industrial region studied (e.g. proximity to Lakes Superior, Michigan, Huron, Erie and Ontario and the St. Lawrence River for the American and Canadian Great Lakes region; presence of mineral deposits in Abitibi-Témiscamingue; abundant energy resources in Saguenay − Lac-Saint-Jean)
    1. Indicates measures that have contributed to the development of the industrial region studied (e.g. government subsidies to businesses in the Montréal region)
    1. Explains why a particular location promotes the development of industry in the region studied (e.g. the proximity to energy sources in the Saguenay − Lac-Saint-Jean region makes aluminum less costly to produce; the concentration of skilled labour in the Québec City region promotes the development of the pharmaceutical industry)
    1. Indicates factors that promote the concentration of industries in the industrial region studied (e.g. proximity to agri-food markets in Montérégie; concentrated population and large pool of consumers in the American and Canadian Great Lakes region)
  1. Planning and development of an industrial region
    1. Indicates the specialized infrastructure used to develop the industrial region studied (e.g. aqueduct system, energy distribution networks, specialized waste collection services in the American and Canadian Great Lakes region)
    1. Explains the relationship between the industrial sites of the region studied and access to supply and distribution networks (e.g. industrial sites in the American and Canadian Great Lakes region are located next to the St. Lawrence Seaway, ports, rail lines and highways that facilitate access to raw materials and the distribution of finished products)
    1. Indicates constraints faced by businesses in the industrial region studied (e.g. having to comply with urban planning laws and locate a plant in an industrial area in Estrie)
    1. Indicates negative effects of industry in the region studied (e.g. acid rain caused by steel mill emissions in the American and Canadian Great Lakes region)
  1. Issue affecting an industrial region or regions
    1. Explains how the presence of industry in the region studied affects the environment (e.g. pollutants emitted into the air and water disrupt the ecological balance of the Saguenay − Lac-Saint-Jean region; burial of hazardous wastes contaminates the soil and affects the health of residents in the American and Canadian Great Lakes region)
    1. Indicates measures taken by businesses to reduce industrial pollution in the region studied (e.g. setting up water treatment plants in the Montérégie region to purify waste materials discharged into the St. Lawrence River)
    1. Indicates reasons for relocating a business (e.g. cheaper labour costs, less stringent environmental laws)
    1. Indicates causes of declining industrial activity in industrial regions (e.g. relocation of industries to developing countries; resource depletion)
    1. Explains some consequences of declining industrial activity for industrial regions (e.g. plant closures cause direct and indirect job losses, which increase unemployment and reduce the standard of living of the population in the region)
    1. Explains some of the repercussions of relocating industries in developing countries (e.g. job creation and the development of road infrastructure and energy distribution networks improve living conditions; less stringent environmental standards increase air and water pollution)
 
    1. Indicates measures taken to attenuate the effects of declining industrial activity in the region studied (e.g. development of resource processing activities and industry diversification in the Saguenay − Lac-Saint-Jean region)

Tourist regions
Forest regions
Energy-producing regions

Haut de page