Geography (Cycle One)

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Regional territory

Tourist regions
Forest regions
Industrial regions

A regional territory is organized around the exploitation of a resource. Four types of regional territories are studied: tourist regions, forest regions, energy-producing regions and industrial regions. Studying these regions makes it possible to understand how a territory is organized around economic activity.

C.   Energy-producing regions

An energy-producing region is organized around the exploitation and commercialization of a natural resource. To meet growing energy needs, it is important to promote the long-term development of the resource through responsible management that shows respect for the environment.

The study of one of the four energy-producing regions suggested in the program is compulsory. Teachers may choose from among the following: Alberta, the Persian Gulf, the Côte-Nord and Jamésie. Cycle teams may determine in what year the energy-producing region will be studied .

The concepts prescribed by the program are not described using specific statements. It is by using all of the knowledge related to a territory that students develop their understanding of the following concepts: planning and development, autonomy, commercialization, energy dependence, greenhouse effect, globalization, multinational, global warming, resource and energy source.

  1. KNOWLEDGE RELATED TO ENERGY-PRODUCING REGIONS
Year

Student constructs knowledge with teacher guidance.

Student applies knowledge by the end of the school year.

 

Student reinvests knowledge.

1 ou 2
  1. Location of an energy-producing region
    1. Locates the energy-producing region studied in the appropriate continent and country
    1. Locates oil - and gas-producing countries on a map of the world (e.g. Saudi Arabia, Brazil, Canada, China, United Arab Emirates, Iraq, Iran, Kuwait, Nigeria, Russia, Venezuela)
    1. Locates, on a world map, the countries that consume the most energy per capita (e.g. in 2010: Australia, Canada, United States, Finland, Norway, New Zealand, Sweden)
  1. Characteristics of an energy-producing region
    1. Names the form of energy developed in the energy-producing region studied (e.g. hydroelectric power in Jamésie; oil and natural gas in the Persian Gulf)
    1. Indicates uses for the form of energy developed in the region studied (e.g. in Alberta, hydrocarbons are used as a source of fuel for vehicles, heating and power plants)
    1. Explains the relationship between certain characteristics of the natural environment and the form of energy developed in the region studied (e.g. the steep slope and strong flow of the La Grande River and the Great Whale River in Jamésie are conducive to the production of hydroelectric power; the accumulation of decayed plant and animal life on ancient seafloors helped create oil and natural gas deposits in Alberta and around the Persian Gulf)
    1. Indicates energy sources developed in the region studied (e.g. hydroelectric energy produced in the Côte-Nord region is a renewable energy source; hydrocarbons extracted in Alberta are a nonrenewable energy source; wind energy in Jamésie is an inexhaustible energy source)
  1. Planning and development of an energy-producing region
    1. Indicates infrastructure used to exploit the energy source in the region studied (e.g. derricks are used to extract oil in the Persian Gulf; open pit mines, to extract oil from tar sands in Alberta; oil rigs, to drill oil in the Persian Gulf; reservoirs and dams, to generate hydroelectric power in Jamésie)
    1. Indicates infrastructure used to process energy resources in the region studied (e.g. oil refinery in Alberta; hydroelectric power plants, wind farms in Québec)
    1. Names organizations associated with the development of the energy source exploited in the region studied (e.g. Hydro-Québec for hydroelectric power in Jamésie and the Côte-Nord; multinationals for oil production in the Persian Gulf; Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries [OPEC] for oil production in the Persian Gulf)
    1. Indicates means used to transport energy resources in the region studied (e.g. high-voltage power lines connect hydroelectric dams to power stations and transmission and distribution substations in Québec; oil and gas pipelines transport hydrocarbons from extraction sites to refineries in Alberta)
  1. Issue affecting an energy-producing region or regions
    1. Indicates measures taken to improve energy supply and reduce energy dependence in the region studied (e.g. search for renewable resources in Jamésie; creation of OPEC in the Persian Gulf)
    1. Indicates measures taken to help reduce energy consumption and increase self-reliance (e.g. dual energy, hybrid vehicles, improved public transit, development of energy-efficient appliances)
    1. Indicates the consequences of energy resource development for the region studied (e.g. flooding of vast areas of land in Jamésie; degradation of the environment and depletion of groundwater caused by tar sands oil extraction in Alberta)
    1. Explains the impact of the development of alternative energy sources (e.g. biofuel production requires large quantities of grain and thus contributes to the world’s food crisis)
    1. Explains the impact of growing energy consumption on the environment (e.g. growing energy consumption worldwide contributes to global warming and environmental degradation)
    1. Indicates some of the most energy-intensive industries (e.g. aluminum, steel, petrochemical plants)

Tourist regions
Forest regions
Industrial regions

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