Geography (Cycle One)

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Protected territory

Knowledge related to protected territory

A protected territory is a natural space organized according to a plan designed to ensure the protection of the natural heritage and ecosystems, its management and its economic development. Certain parks, which protect features of outstanding value or in danger of disappearing, are included on UNESCO’s World Heritage List. It is important to seek a balance between the use of such parks and the protection of the natural environment. Only one type of protected territory is studied in Secondary Cycle One: natural parks.

The study of one of the two protected territories suggested in the program is compulsory. Teachers may choose between a natural park in Québec or Canada and the Galapagos Islands. Cycle teams may determine in what year the protected territory will be studied .

The concepts prescribed by the program are not described using specific statements. It is by using all of the knowledge related to a territory that students develop their understanding of the following concepts: planning and development, conservation/reservation, environment, natural park, natural heritage and regulations.

Knowledge related to protected territory

Student constructs knowledge with teacher guidance.

Student applies knowledge by the end of the school year.

 

Student reinvests knowledge.

Year
1 or 2
  1. Location of a natural park
    1. Locates the natural park studied in the appropriate continent and country
    1. Locates protected natural parks on a map of the world (e.g. Forillon and Banff national parks in Canada; the Galapagos National Park and Marine Reserve in Ecuador; the whale sanctuary of El Vizcaino in Mexico; Sagarmatha National Park in Nepal; Serengeti National Park in Tanzania; the Giant’s Causeway in Ireland; Yellowstone National Park in the United States)
  1. Characteristics of a natural park
    1. Lists natural heritage elements in the park studied (e.g. fauna, flora, wetlands, glaciers in Banff National Park)
    1. Indicates why the natural park studied has been created (e.g. to protect endangered species in the Galapagos National Park and Marine Reserve; to protect natural phenomena such as glaciers in Banff National Park; to protect nesting sites in the Parc national de l’Île-Bonaventure-et-du-Rocher-Percé)
    1. Lists recreational activities authorized in the natural park studied (e.g. hiking, ecotourism, animal watching in Forillon National Park)
    1. Indicates rules to follow to protect the natural park studied (e.g. respecting marked trails, flora, restricted areas in Banff National Park)
    1. Explains the economic benefits for the region surrounding the natural park studied (e.g. opening Banff National Park to the public creates a demand for workers, who in turn create a demand for services, which generates new jobs)
  1. Planning and development of a natural park
    1. Names different zones of the natural park studied (e.g. conservation zones, wildlife and natural land zones, recreational activity zones at the Galapagos National Park and Marine Reserve)
    1. Indicates measures taken to protect the natural park studied (e.g. restricted access to certain areas, use of marked trails, restricted number of visitors at Mingan Archipelago National Park Reserve)
    1. Indicates some of the infrastructure in place in the natural park studied (e.g. reception centres, marked trails and wharfs at the Parc national de l’Île-Bonaventure-et-du-Rocher-Percé)
  1. Issue affecting a natural park or parks
    1. Explains why protecting the natural environment must be reconciled with recreational activities in natural parks (e.g. the ecosystems protected by natural parks are fragile and recreational activities of visitors must be controlled to avoid disrupting these environments)
    1. Explains some of the impacts associated with visiting the natural park studied (e.g. in the Saguenay − St. Lawrence Marine Park, visitors who do not follow the regulations may disturb the balance of the flora and fauna)
    1. Indicates natural hazards that may threaten a protected park (e.g. forest fires, erosion, flooding)
    1. Indicates human actions that may threaten a protected park (e.g. road construction, exploitation of natural resources, poaching)
    1. Indicates criteria established by UNESCO to include natural parks on the World Heritage List (e.g. the park must be an outstanding example of the Earth’s history or of biological processes)

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