Physics - Secondary V Optional Program

Print section

Dynamics

Studying dynamics gives students the opportunity to acquire scientific and technical knowledge of phenomena and applications1 that involve forces acting on bodies.

Over the course of their secondary school education, students have explored increasingly complex phenomena, problems and applications. They have acquired knowledge related to The Material World, The Living World, The Earth and Space and the Technological World. By using the experimental method, modeling and carrying out analysis, they are able to describe, understand and explain the laws and models governing dynamics. Students learn to apply this new knowledge in a variety of contexts to explain phenomena or make predictions. In this way, they acquire a better understanding of the effects of forces on bodies in the world around us and of the related applications.

Student constructs knowledge with teacher guidance.

Student applies knowledge by the end of the school year.

 

Student reinvests knowledge.

Secondary
AST AST

SE
ST ST

EST
PHY
3 4 3 4 5
Secondary Cycle One
    1. Mass
        • Defines the concept of mass
    1. Effects of a force
        • Explains the effects of a force in a technical object (change in the motion of an object, distortion of a material)
    1. Simples machines
        • Identifies wheels, inclined planes and levers in simple technical objects (e.g. a wheelbarrow is made up of a second-class lever and a wheel)
        • Describes qualitatively the mechanical advantages of different types of levers (first-class, second-class, third-class) in different applications
Secondary Cycle Two
Only those concepts specific to the Physics program are identified by a number.
Light blue shading indicates that the student acquired this knowledge in Secondary III or IV.
    1. Relationship between work, force and distance travelled
        • Describes qualitatively the relationship between the work done, the force applied on a body and the distance travelled by the body
     
        • Applies the mathematical relationship between work, effective force and distance travelled (W = FΔd)
     
    1. Relationship between mass and weight
        • Describes qualitatively the relationship between mass and weight
     
        • Applies the mathematical relationship between mass and weight (Fg = mg)
     
    1. Effective force
        • Defines effective force as the component of the applied force parallel to the direction of travel
     
        • Determines graphically the magnitude of the effective force in a given situation
     
  1. Gravitational acceleration
    1. Compares the average values of gravitational acceleration on Earth and on the Moon (9,8 m/s2 on Earth, 1,6 m/s2 on the Moon)
       
  1. Gravitational force
    1. Associates the free fall of a body with the effect of gravitational force
       
    1. Associates the gravitational force of a body with its weight
       
    1. Determines the component of gravitational force parallel to the displacement of a body (e.g. inclined plane)
       
  1. Newton’s Laws
    1. Describes qualitatively the law of inertia (Newton’s First Law)
       
    1. Describes qualitatively the relationship between the force acting on a body, its mass and its acceleration (Newton’s Second Law)
       
    1. Applies the mathematical relationship between the force acting on a body, mass and acceleration (F = ma)
       
    1. Describes qualitatively the law of action-reaction (Newton’s Third Law)
       
    1. Explains a phenomenon or how a technical object works, using Newton’s Laws
       
    1. Pressure
        • Defines pressure as the force exerted by particles when they collide with a constricting surface
     
    1. Adhesion and friction of parts
        • Describes the advantages and disadvantages of the adhesion and friction of parts in a technical object
     
  1. Force of friction
    1. Explains the possible effects of a frictional force  (slows down, stops or impedes the motion of a body)
       
    1. Names the factors that can affect the force of friction in a given situation
      (e.g. nature of the surfaces that are in contact, shape of a body that is moving in a fluid)
       
    1. Determines the value of the force of friction in a given situation2
      (force of friction = applied force - net force)
       
    1. Constraints
        • Describes the constraints to which different technical objects are subject: tension, compression, torsion (e.g. the top of a beam is subject to compression)
     
        • Describes the constraints to which different technical objects are subject: tension, compression, torsion, deflection, shearing (e.g. a diving board is subject to deflection)
     
  1. Centripetal force
    1. Explains qualitatively the effect of centripetal force on a body in motion
       
  1. Free-body diagram
    1. Uses vectors to represent the forces that act on a body
       
  1. Equilibrium and resultant of several forces
    1. Determines the magnitude and direction of the vector associated with the resultant force of a system of forces
       
    1. Determines the magnitude and direction of the vector associated with the balancing force of a system of forces
       
1. “Application” is understood to mean a technical object, a system, a product or a process.
2. Calculations using the coefficients of friction are not required.

Haut de page