Mathematics

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Discrete Mathematics

Social Choice

Graphs
Matrices

Mathematical models are used in social, political and economic situations. Some models are used to ensure the fair distribution of individuals and goods, while other models or voting procedures involve aggregating individual preferences in order to clarify the choices to be made in satisfying as many people as possible (e.g. elections, market surveys, classifications). By using the mathematical concepts and processes already acquired, students in the Cultural, Social and Technical option can compare and analyze the different models associated with voting procedures. (Which method is most accurate? Which method is most representative of the majority? In what way could results be influenced?)

The following tables present the learning content associated with social choice theory. By basing themselves on the concepts and processes targeted, students develop the three competencies of the program, which in turn enable students to better integrate the mathematical concepts and processes presented.

Introduction to social choice theory  

Student constructs knowledge with teacher guidance.

Student applies knowledge by the end of the school year.

 

Student reinvests knowledge.

Elementary

Secondary
Cycle
One
Cycle
Two
  6 1 2 3 4 5
  1. Makes decisions concerning social choices
 
    1. Counts and enumerates possibilities
          CST
    TS
    S
    1. Compares and interprets different voting procedures and their results
      Note : In cases that involve aggregating individual preferences, situations will be limited to no more than 4 “candidates.” In particular, students compare and analyze majority rule, plurality voting, the Borda count, the Condorcet method, the elimination or runoff method and approval voting. See Avenues of Exploration in Appendix E of the Secondary Cycle Two Mathematics program, p. 125.
          CST
    TS
    S

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