Chemistry - Secondary V Optional Program

Introduction

This document provides additional information about the learning prescribed in the optional Secondary V Chemistry program. It is intended to help teachers with their lesson planning.

To progress in their learning, students need to do more than merely acquire knowledge. They must also learn to apply their knowledge in a variety of increasingly complex situations. By appropriately using the knowledge, techniques and strategies listed in this document, they will develop the competencies outlined in the Chemistry program. By applying these competencies, they will acquire new knowledge which, in turn, will help them further develop their competencies.

In order to seek answers or solutions to chemistry problems (Competency 1), students must become familiar with strategies and acquire conceptual and technical knowledge that will enable them to define a problem, explore it and then justify their methodological choices and results. Similarly, the appropriate scientific concepts and principles can help them explain phenomena or understand the operation of objects and, consequently, make use of their scientific and technological knowledge (Competency 2). Finally, in order to communicate ideas relating to questions involving chemistry (Competency 3), they must acquire and apply knowledge that will enable them to interpret or produce messages using the languages and types of representations specific to science and technology.

In Secondary Cycle One, students learn about natural phenomena and man-made objects that interest them. In Cycle Two, the concepts are organized around applications connected to seven technological fields, in the Applied Science and Technology General Education Path, or environmental issues in the General Education Path or in the optional programs in Secondary 4.

The four tables in this document outline the knowledge related to the general concepts presented in the chemistry program: gases, energy changes in reactions, reaction rates and chemical equilibrium. Each table is preceded by a text explaining how knowledge of the general concept contributes to the students’ learning in chemistry. This is followed by a list of the main concepts studied in Secondary Cycle One and related to this general concept. Lastly, the table itself lists a certain number of statements that refer to subject matter covered during Secondary Cycle Two and that is relevant to the study of concepts in the chemistry program.1 Two other tables provide information about the appropriate techniques and strategies for students to use.

The concepts are further clarified by a list of statements indicating the degree of complexity of the subject matter targeted and explanations of the progression of learning from one year to the next. In some cases, specifications about the extent of the knowledge to be addressed appear in parentheses.

1.  Only those concepts specific to the Chemistry program are identified by a number.

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