Physical Education and Health

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Competency 1 – Performs movement skills in different physical activity settings

Knowledge (Concepts to be learned)

Skills

Student constructs knowledge with teacher guidance.

Student applies knowledge by the end of the school year.

 

Student reinvests knowledge.

E: The letter E indicates that some of the concepts related to this topic were covered in elementary school.

Elementary

Secondary
Cycle
One
Cycle
Two
  1. Principles of balance (static and dynamic)1
  1 2 3 4 5
  1. Principles of static balance
    1. Applies principles for maintaining his/her balance in various postures
      (e.g. In a complex posture on hands or feet, one’s base should be widened to maintain balance.)
E      
  1. Principles of dynamic balance
    1. Applies principles for maintaining or restoring his/her balance when performing various movements
      (e.g. In a tight turn while skiing or cycling, the centre of gravity must be shifted toward the inside; in the shot put, the weight is transferred from the back foot to the front foot and balance is re-established when the back foot is brought forward.)
E    
  1. Principles of coordination2
  1 2 3 4 5
  1. Applies principles for coordinating his/her movements when carrying out various actions
    (e.g. In a javelin throw, joints must be used in the correct order, starting with the approach run and followed by the arm being cocked so that all the power in the shoulder can be harnessed.)
E    
  1. Principles of synchronization
  1 2 3 4 5
  1. Throws an object to attain a moving target
E      
  1. Receives an object by moving to the point where the object will fall
    (e.g. In juggling or rhythmic gymnastics, the entire body or the arms must be moved to recover an object.)
E      
  1. Synchronizes his/her actions according to a rhythm
    (e.g. synchronizing breathing with arm movements when doing the crawl, performing a routine to music, synchronizing successive jumps in a hurdle race)
       
  1. Locomotor skills
  1 2 3 4 5
  1. Movement in cyclical activities3
    1. Walks while applying a technique appropriate to the duration of the activity or the distance involved
      (e.g. flexing arms, shortening strides in order to increase the pace during a hike)
E        
    1. Runs while applying a technique appropriate to the duration of the activity or the distance involved
      1. Sprinting
        (e.g. lengthening the stride, raising the knee, swinging arms back and forth, with elbows held at 90 degrees at all times)
E      
      1. Long-distance and middle-distance running
        (e.g. pointing the toes forward and using the arms throughout the race)
E
    1. Goes up, goes down, changes direction, goes around, goes over, climbs and brakes by applying an appropriate technique given the environmental constraints
      (e.g. along adventure trails, approaching the uphill sections with toes pointed, the top half of the body learning forward while shortening one's stride)
E      
  1. Movement in single-action activities
    1. Performs different types of jumps, applying an appropriate technique
      1. Standing jumps such as the squat jump, half-turn jump, scissor jump and long jump
        (e.g. in a standing jump, swinging the arms for more momentum; in rope jumping, adopting a stable position at the outset and slightly flexing the knees to gain momentum)
E      
      1. Running jumps such as the long jump, high jump and triple jump
        (e.g. accelerating gradually during a run-up, lowering the centre of gravity before pushing off, blocking with the take-off leg)
E
  1. Movement in technical/artistic activities
    1. Performs complex rotations on the floor or in the air, applying an appropriate technique such as cartwheel, round-off, forward or backward roll, turn and half-turn on the floor or from a box
      (e.g. keeping the body perpendicular to the floor during a cartwheel)
E      
  1. Nonlocomotor skills
  1 2 3 4 5
  1. Postures and rotations (e.g. in technical/artistic activities)
    1. Maintains complex postures, applying an appropriate technique
      (e.g. forming a triangle with the hands and head to successfully perform a headstand)
E      
    1. Masters turning on his/her own axis on the floor, in the air or on apparatus, applying an appropriate technique
      (e.g. bringing the arms closer to the body to increase rotational speed)
E      
  1. Manipulation skills4
  1 2 3 4 5
  1. Handling objects with or without an implement (e.g. in skill-based or single-action activities)
    1. Performs a variety of object-handling actions, applying an appropriate technique
      (e.g. while dribbling, absorbing the force of the ball rather than simply hitting it, keeping the head up)
      1. Handles an object with the dominant or non-dominant hand, on the spot, while moving or through obstacles
        (e.g. figure 8 dribble)
E      
      1. Handles an object with the dominant or non-dominant foot on the spot, while moving or through obstacles
        (e.g. dribbling a soccer ball between cones and bowling pins, bouncing an aki ball off different parts of the body)
E    
      1. Handles several objects at the same time on the spot, while moving or on fixed or moving apparatus
        (e.g. juggling three balls in a cascade pattern or in columns on a cylinder, dribbling two balls)
E  
    1. Performs a variety of object-handling actions with implements, applying an appropriate technique
      (e.g. holding the stick with both hands, not focusing too intently on the object)
      1. Handles an object using an implement on the spot, while moving or through obstacles
        (e.g. controlling a ball with a broom)
E    
  1. Projecting objects with or without an implement (e.g. in skill-based or single-action activities)
    1. Throws a variety of objects, applying an appropriate technique
      (e.g. keeping the eyes on the target, cocking the arm, bringing the opposite leg toward the target, transferring the weight)
      1. Throws an object underhand
        (e.g. throwing a softball, bowling)
E        
      1. Throws an object with two hands
        (e.g., throw-in and chest pass in soccer)
E      
      1. Throws an object sideways
        (e.g. throwing a Frisbee, a disk)
E    
      1. Throws an object overhand
        (e.g. throwing a basketball, throwing a javelin, passing in flag-football)
E    
      1. Throws an object using an implement
        (e.g. throwing in intercross)
E    
    1. Strikes objects in various ways, with or without an implement, applying an appropriate technique
      (e.g. stable position facing the target, weight transfer, trunk rotation, eyes focused on the object to be struck)
      1. Strikes an immobile object
        (e.g. golf stroke, field-goal kick, slap shot in hockey skills competition)
E      
      1. Strikes a moving object
        (e.g. hitting a baseball, kicking the ball upon reception or a smash in volleyball)
     
  1. Receiving objects with or without an implement
    1. Catches a variety of objects, applying an appropriate technique
      (e.g. watching the object, intercepting the object, slowing down the object and bringing it toward oneself in order to be ready to resume play)
      1. Catches an object without an implement
        (e.g. catching a ball thrown against a wall, blocking or deflecting a shot on goal in team handball)
E        
      1. Catches an object with an implement
        (e.g. catching with an intercross stick, catching a spool with the string in diabolo, blocking or deflecting a shot on goal in hockey)
E    

Knowledge (Concepts to be learned)

1.  Like the principles of coordination and synchronization, the principles of balance are essential for successfully carrying out different actions. These principles can be used in isolation or grouped together in most actions the students perform. Furthermore, control over balance and coordination will vary according to the adolescent’s morphological changes.
2.  In the elementary school program, certain principles (balance and coordination) are solely associated with the competency Performs, whereas in secondary school, they are associated with the competencies Performs and Interacts.
3.  Depending on the facilities available and local resources, cyclical activities other than walking or running can also foster the acquisition of locomotor skills, notably swimming, skating, snowshoeing or cross-country skiing.
4.  Several of the manipulation skills mentioned here can be performed alone or with others; these actions can be used to develop the competency Performs movement skills in different physical activity settings (e.g. creating a dribbling or juggling sequence) or the competency Interacts with others in different physical activity settings (e.g. dribbling and passing in a match of team handball).

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