Visual Arts

Print section

Knowledge

Cycle Two: Compulsory program
Cycle Two: Visual Arts optional program
Cycle Two: Visual Arts and Multimedia optional program

Student constructs knowledge with teacher guidance.

Student applies knowledge by the end of the school year.

 

Student reinvests knowledge.

E: The letter E indicates knowledge from the elementary-level Visual Arts program which is developed in greater depth or applied in Secondary Cycle One.

Elementary

Secondary
Cycle
One
Cycle
Two
  1. Transforming gestures, materials and tools
  1 2 3 4 5
  1. Transforming gestures
    1. Identifies the following transforming gestures: gluing, tearing, cutting out, drawing, printing, modelling, painting and engraving
E          
    1. Identifies some transforming gestures, including snipping, applying coloured pigments, assembling, notching, balancing, engraving, incising, shaping, photographing, pinching, digitizing, joining, freehand drawing, intaglio printing
       
    1. Differentiates transforming gestures that are suited to various techniques (e.g. in freehand drawing, applying coloured pigments when painting)
       
    1. Compares the properties of some transforming gestures that are associated with various techniques, including sculpting
       
    1. Compares the impact of transforming gestures on the materials
       
    1. Compares the transforming gestures (e.g. video filmmaking, animating an image)
       
    1. Compares the quality of the transforming gestures used on the materials (e.g. fast and slow, fluid and intermittent)
       
  1. Materials
    1. Identifies the following materials: wax crayon , felt pen, gouache, paper and cardboard, oil pastel, modelling clay, clay, charcoal and dry pastel
E          
    1. Identifies some materials (e.g. felt pen, gouache, oil pastel, India ink, coloured ink)
       
    1. Differentiates between traditional materials (e.g. graphite pen, drawing sticks [red chalk, bistre, black and white], clay, gouache)
       
    1. Picks out the properties of traditional materials (e.g. opacity of printing ink, fluidity of India ink, transparency of coloured ink)
     
    1. Compares the properties of traditional materials (e.g. opacity of acrylic, fragility of polystyrene, resistance of the linoleum) and of materials that are suited for fine crafts (e.g. direction of the wood grain, durability of the resin, transparency of the glass, flexibility of the wire)
       
    1. Compares the properties of the materials (e.g. transparency of the light on an image depicted on digital or traditional support)
       
  1. Tools
    1. Identifies the following tools: brush, scissors, mouse and paintbrush
E          
    1. Identifies the following tools: digital camera, electronic pen, sculpting tool (wooden modeling tool; loop, wire and ribbon tool), gouge , scanner , nib, nib holder , graphics tablet
       
    1. Differentiates between traditional tools (e.g. electronic pen, sculpting tool [wooden modeling tool; loop, wire and ribbon tool], gouge , scanner, nib, nib holder , graphics tablet)
       
    1. Differentiates between the functions of various tools and their effects on the materials (e.g. a soft paintbrush to create fluid lines, a brush to create texture, a fine-nib to trace lines and a round-nib to make dots)
     
    1. Compares traditional tools or technological tools with the tools used for fine crafts (e.g. paintbrush, brush, computer, drawing and image processing software, scanner, digital camera, gouge, chisel , pliers)
       
    1. Compares the functions of traditional or technological tools with the tools used for fine crafts  (e.g. pliers for cutting, turning and tightening; knives and cutters for glass, leather and wood)
       
    1. Compares traditional tools with multimedia tools1 (e.g. graphite pencil versus the drawing tool offered in an image processing software application)
       
  1. Techniques
    1. Identifies the following techniques: collage, drawing, modelling, painting and engraving
E          
    1. Identifies some techniques, including printing, assembling and shaping
       
    1. Differentiates between techniques (e.g. drawing and painting, engraving and printing, shaping and modelling)
       
    1. Differentiates between technique variations  (e.g. when modelling clay, pinching and joining the clay, making forms by shaping and hollowing out the clay)
     
    1. Compares technique variations (e.g. for assembling: gluing or assembling forms with wire; for ceramics: slab construction, wheel work and making coils)
       
    1. Compares the potential of various techniques (e.g. for acrylic paint: producing the effect of transparency by adding water, or creating texture by adding polymer; and for textile productions: weaving fibres, producing embroideries, or felting wool)
       
    1. Differentiates between techniques (e.g. assembling, shaping, modelling, animation, 3D computer modelling, photographing)
       
    1. Compares the potential of techniques (e.g. drawing with a nib versus animating an image using software)
       
  1. Concepts
  1 2 3 4 5
  1. Visual arts and multimedia language (elements)

  • 1.1. Shape
    1. Identifies rounded or angular shapes
E          
    1. Identifies figurative and abstract (non-figurative) forms
       
    1. Differentiates figurative from non-figurative forms
       
    1. Describes the characteristics of figurative and non-figurative forms (e.g. precise, vague, detailed, simplified)
     
    1. Highlights the symbolic meaning of various forms (e.g. a circle symbolizes the absolute, perfection and infinity; a triangle symbolizes harmony and safety; a square symbolizes stability and the absence of tensions)
     
  • 1.2. Lines
    1. Identifies lines, including horizontal, vertical, short, long, curved, straight, oblique, broken and circular lines
E          
    1. Identifies various types of lines (e.g. drawn, painted, incised and tangible)
       
    1. Highlights the characteristics of various types of lines (e.g. thin, thick, continuous)
       
    1. Describes the characteristics of various types of lines (e.g. a tangible line has a real thickness; an abstract line is created upon the meeting of two [coloured or uncoloured] surfaces)
     
    1. Compares the effects produced by different types of lines (e.g. use of straight and oblique lines enumerated or superimposed to create values)
     
    1. Highlights the symbolic meaning of various types of lines (e.g. a vertical line symbolizes strength, rigidity and stasis; a horizontal line symbolizes calmness, rest and tranquility; an oblique line represents movement, dynamism, ascension or falling)
       
  • 1.3. Colours (pigments and in transmitted light)
    1. Identifies in pigments: the primary, secondary, warm and cool colours
E          
    1. Identifies in pigments: light and dark colours
       
    1. Identifies the colours in transmitted light, including intensity and contrast
       
    1. Identifies complementary and tertiary colours in pigments also
       
    1. Describes the characteristics of certain colours in pigments
       
    1. Differentiates between the colours of pigments and the colours in transmitted light
       
    1. Compares the colours of pigments with the colours in transmitted light
       
    1. Highlights the symbolic meaning of various colours of pigments and colours in transmitted light (e.g. in the Western world, black symbolizes mourning and red symbolizes passion and love)
       
  • 1.4. Value
    1. Identifies light and dark values
E          
    1. Identifies values in tones, in colours and in shades
       
    1. Differentiates values in tone, in colours and in shades
       
    1. Compares the functions of values (e.g. for suggesting volume and perspective)
       
    1. Highlights the symbolic meaning of values (e.g. use of a light colour to paint an element to emphasize the subject)
       
  • 1.5. Texture
    1. Identifies some textures
E          
    1. Identifies a variety of textures (e.g. wood grain, textile fibres, fur)
       
    1. Differentiates real textures and represented textures (e.g. use of drawn lines or dots to represent wood grain)
       
    1. Compares the functions of different textures (e.g. use of textures to distringuish a surface or to represent a specific material)
       
    1. Highlights the symbolic meaning of different textures (e.g. roughness to symbolize discomfort)
       
  • 1.6. Pattern
    1. Identifies some patterns
E          
    1. Identifies various patterns (e.g. flower, striped, checkered or polka-dot patterns)
       
    1. Highlights the characteristics of different patterns (e.g. geometric, animal, floral or nature )
       
    1. Compares the functions of decorative patterns (e.g. to embellish or characterize a surface) and symbolic patterns (e.g. to express beliefs or specific meanings)
       
    1. Highlights the symbolic meaning of different patterns (e.g. flower or nature in Roman architecture symbolize the harmony of the universe; patterns on Berber pottery symbolize the fertility of the land and of women)
       
  • 1.7. Volume
    1. Identifies three-dimensional forms
E          
    1. Identifies tangible volume
       
    1. Differentiates between tangible volume and suggested volume
       
    1. Compares various types of volume, including filled, hollow and empty volumes
       
    1. Highlights the symbolic meaning of the different types of volume (e.g. a sphere symbolizes entity and perfection; a cube represents stability)
       
  1. Visual arts language and multimedia language (space)
  • 2.1. Spatial organization
    1. Identifies ways of organizing elements in space : enumeration, juxtaposition, repetition and alternance, superimposition, symmetry and asymmetry
E          
    1. Differentiates ways of organizing elements in two- and three-dimensional space (e.g. juxtaposition and superimposition, symmetry and asymmetry)
       
    1. Compares various ways of organizing elements in space, including balance, movement and rhythm
       
  • 2.2. Spatiotemporal organization
    1. Identifies various ways of organizing two-dimensional, three-dimensional, virtual and spatiotemporal space (e.g. point of view, image projection, installation and performance)
       
  • 2.3. Spatial representation
    1. Identifies ways of representing elements in space: perspective with overlapping and perspective with vanishing point
E          
    1. Identifies two methods of representing three-dimensional space on a two-dimensional support: perspective with overlapping and diminishing perspective
       
    1. Differentiates methods of representing three-dimensional space on a two-dimensional support (e.g. perspective with overlapping, diminishing perspective, isometric perspective )
       
    1. Describes methods of representing three-dimensional space on a two-dimensional support (e.g. diminishing perspective, isometric perspective, perspective with vanishing point)
       
    1. Compares methods of representing three-dimensional space on a two-dimensional support (e.g. diminishing perspective, isometric perspective, perspective with one or more vanishing points, aerial perspective [atmospheric])
       
    1. Describes the functions of different types of perspective to produce an effect of distance or to suggest volume
       
  1. Visual arts repertoire2 and cultural references
  1 2 3 4 5
    1. Visual arts productions3
E          
    1. Names some artistic periods (e.g. prehistory, Renaissance, contemporary)
       
    1. Places some periods and art movements in time and space (e.g. on a timeline: prehistory, antiquity, Middle Ages, Impressionism, Dadaism, Cubism)
       
    1. Associates works with different periods and associated artists with art movements (e.g. Renaissance, Baroque, expressionism, surrealism, futurism, Automatism, Group of Seven)
       
    1. Describes the characteristics of different periods and art movements (e.g. the varied brushstrokes of impressionists, the unusual compositions produced by the surrealists, the vibrant colours used by Les Fauves, the simplicity and mathematical rigour of the Plasticiens)
     
    1. Compares art works, including art works from Québec, derived from different art movements and periods, including comptemporary and current art (e.g. hyperrealist, conceptual, installation, land art)
     
    1. Compares multimedia productions (e.g. network art, robotic art, multimedia show) and various art works, including art works from Québec, that belong to different art movements and periods (e.g. silent films, photos on metal plates, flipbook, da­guer­reo­ty­pe, zoetrope, performance)
     
    1. Names some creators and some of their productions
     
    1. Differentiates between personal images and media images (e.g. scene from rural settings or folklore , coats of arms, logos, product packaging)
       
    1. Describes the functions of personal images, media images and cultural objects (e.g. reflection of a people’s identify, participation in art revival, promotion of a product, celebration of an event or tackling a problem of a period)
       
    1. Associates some cultural references with aspects of his/her personal culture, with Québec culture and with other cultures (e.g. graffiti, tags, urban frescoes, architecture)
       
    1. Compares the functions of different cultural references (e.g. following the evolution of a useful object from its origins until today, the transformation of a celebration or ritual over the centuries)
     
    1. Situates cultural references in time and space (e.g. the Biosphere [the U.S. pavillion at Expo 67], the Refus global, from the paintbrush to the electronic pen, paint [tempera, oil, acrylic])
     
1.  The complete list of tools is available in the Québec Education Program under Program Content for Visual Arts and Multimedia.
2.  The visual arts repertoire includes works of art, cultural objects and media images. These works can also be associated with cultural references.
3.  Since these elements are evident in action, they are included in the Applications of Knowledge section section.

Haut de page