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Geography, History and Citizenship Education

Knowledge related to the diversity of societies and their territories

In Cycle One, students become familiar with the concept of diversity. By comparing everyday objects, economic activities and means of transportation, they continue the process of developing their representation of space, which they began in preschool. In Cycles Two and Three, students become more open to the diversity of societies and their territories. They compare two societies during the same period. They acquire knowledge about their differences in terms of the characteristics of the territory, language, religion and type of government.

Legend1

Student constructs knowledge with teacher guidance.

Student applies knowledge by the end of the school year.

 

Student reinvests knowledge.

Elementary
Cycle One Cycle Two Cycle Three
  1. Here and elsewhere
    First representation of space (Cycle One)
1 2 3 4 5 6
  1. Indicates differences between his/her environment and an unfamiliar environment:
    1. everyday objects (e.g. toys, furniture, clothing)
       
    1. means of transportation and transportation routes (e.g. car, train, airplane, roads, highways)
       
    1. economic activity (e.g. development and processing of resources, services)
       
    1. characteristics of the territory (e.g. relief, climate, bodies of water, resources)
       
  1. Iroquoian society and Algonquian society around 1500
1 2 3 4 5 6
  1. Indicates differences between Iroquoian society and Algonquian society around 1500:
    1. way of life (sedentary; nomadic)
       
    1. economic activities (agriculture; lack of agriculture)
       
    1. political structure (matriarchal; patriarchal)
       
    1. dwellings (villages of longhouses; wigwams)
       
  1. Iroquoian society and Inca society around 1500
1 2 3 4 5 6
  1. Indicates differences between Iroquoian society and Inca society around 1500:
    1. means of selecting chiefs and their power (chosen by women elders, limited powers; hereditary, full powers)
       
    1. social structure (community; hierarchy)
       
    1. dwellings (villages of longhouses; towns)
       
    1. characteristics of the territory occupied (e.g. relief, climate, bodies of water, resources)
       
  1. Canadian society in New France and societies in the Thirteen Colonies around 1745
1 2 3 4 5 6
  1. Indicates differences between Canadian society in New France and societies in the Thirteen Colonies around 1745:
    1. number of inhabitants
       
    1. type of government (no House of Assembly; House of Assembly)
       
    1. language (French; English)
       
    1. religion (Catholicism; Protestantism)
       
    1. economic activities (fur trade; diversified economy)
       
    1. military force (e.g. soldiers, ships, armaments)
       
    1. characteristics of the territory occupied (e.g. relief, climate, bodies of water, resources)
       
  1. Québec society and Canadian society in the Prairies around 1905
1 2 3 4 5 6
  1. Indicates differences between Québec society and Canadian society in the Prairies around 1905:
    1. composition of the population (francophones; anglophones, European immigrants)
       
    1. economic activities (e.g. industry, agriculture, animal husbandry)
       
    1. main languages (French; English)
       
    1. main religions (Catholicism; Protestantism)
       
    1. characteristics of the territory occupied (e.g. relief, climate, bodies of water, resources)
       
  1. Canadian society in the Prairies and on the West Coast around 1905
1 2 3 4 5 6
  1. Indicates differences between Canadian society in the Prairies and on the West Coast around 1905:
    1. composition of the population (francophones; anglophones, European and Asian immigrants)
       
    1. economic activities (agriculture, animal husbandry; mining, forestry)
       
    1. main religions (Catholicism; Protestantism)
       
    1. characteristics of the territory occupied (e.g. relief, climate, bodies of water, resources)
       
  1. Québec society and an undemocratic society around 1980 (at the teacher’s discretion)
1 2 3 4 5 6
  1. Indicates differences between Québec society and an undemocratic society around 1980:
    1. composition of the population
       
    1. main languages
       
    1. method of making political decisions (democratic; authoritarian)
       
    1. right to vote (yes; no)
       
    1. charter of rights and freedoms (yes; no)
       
  1. Micmac society and Inuit society around 1980
1 2 3 4 5 6
  1. Indicates differences between Micmac society and Inuit society around 1980:
    1. distribution of the population (Gaspésie, Maritimes; Nunavik)
       
    1. economic activities (e.g. fishing, hunting, tourism, crafts)
       
    1. languages (Micmac; Inuktitut)
       
    1. characteristics of the territory occupied (e.g. relief, climate, bodies of water, resources)
       
1.  Presenting societies in chronological fashion allows students to acquire knowledge specific to each type of social and territorial organization studied. This knowledge is, for the most part, applied in the same cycle. Students will use some of this knowledge when studying changes or differences. That is why this document, unlike similar documents in other subjects, does not contain indications concerning the reinvestment of knowledge.

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