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Geography, History and Citizenship Education

Knowledge related to change in a society and its territory

In Cycle One, students become familiar with the concept of change. By comparing everyday objects, economic activities, means of transportation and transportation routes over a period of about a century, they continue the process of developing their representation of time, which they began in preschool. In Cycles Two and Three, students learn to interpret change in a society and its territory. They compare a society during two different periods. They acquire knowledge about the changes that occurred, the role of certain people and groups and the influence of certain events.

Legend1

Student constructs knowledge with teacher guidance.

Student applies knowledge by the end of the school year.

 

Student reinvests knowledge.

Elementary
Cycle One Cycle Two Cycle Three
  1. Past and present
    First representation of time (Cycle One)
1 2 3 4 5 6
    1. Names changes in everyday objects (e.g. toys, CDs, iron, computer, bicycle)
       
    1. Names changes in economic activities (e.g. agriculture, industry)
       
    1. Names changes in means of transportation and transportation routes (e.g. car, train, airplane, roads, highways)
       
  1. Iroquoian society between 1500 and 1745
1 2 3 4 5 6
    1. Indicates changes in the society during this period: occupation of the territory, use of European products (e.g. axe, pot, gun, alcohol), religion, European diseases
       
    1. Names groups that played a role in the changes (e.g. fishermen, missionaries, colonists, military, coureurs de bois)
       
  1. French and Canadian society in New France between 1645 and 1745
1 2 3 4 5 6
    1. Indicates changes in the society during this period (e.g. size of the territory, political organization, distribution and composition of the population, presence of cottage industries)
       
    1. Names people and groups that played a role in the changes: Jean Talon, Gilles Hocquart, explorers, filles du Roy
       
    1. Indicates events that marked this period: implementation of the seigneurial system, explorations, increase in the birth rate, diversification of the economy
       
  1.  Canadian society between 1745 and 1820
1 2 3 4 5 6
    1. Indicates changes in the society during this period (e.g. occupation of the territory, presence of anglophones, lumber trade, canal building, the first newspapers)
       
    1. Names people and groups that played a role in the changes (e.g. Murray, Carleton, English merchants, Loyalists, Gazette de Québec)
       
    1. Indicates events that marked this period (e.g. the Conquest, the first printing shops, parliamentary government)
       
  1. Canadian society and Québec society between 1820 and 1905
1 2 3 4 5 6
    1. Indicates changes in the society during this period: occupation of the territory, industrialization, urbanization, settlement, railway building
       
    1. Names people and groups that played a role in the changes: John A. MacDonald, Honoré Mercier, unions
       
    1. Indicates events that marked this period: Canadian Confederation, unionization, immigration, railway building
       
  1.  Québec society between 1905 and 1980
1 2 3 4 5 6
    1. Indicates changes in the society during this period (e.g. transportation and communication networks, hydroelectric power, rural electrification, mandatory school attendance, free health care)
       
    1. Names people who played a role in the changes (e.g. Maurice Duplessis, Jean Lesage, Robert Bourassa, René Lévesque, P.‑E. Trudeau)
       
    1. Indicates events that marked this period: the Quiet Revolution, the nationalization of hydroelectric power, the construction of hydroelectric power stations, charters of rights and freedoms
       
1.  Presenting societies in chronological fashion allows students to acquire knowledge specific to each type of social and territorial organization studied. This knowledge is, for the most part, applied in the same cycle. Students will use some of this knowledge when studying changes or differences. That is why this document, unlike similar documents in other subjects, does not contain indications concerning the reinvestment of knowledge.

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