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Ethics and Religious Culture

Reflects on ethical questions

At the elementary level, students learn to reflect on ethical questions using simple and familiar situations. Students are asked to reflect on subjects that involve, for example, the needs of living beings, the advantages and disadvantages of group life and the demands of life in society. From one cycle to the next, they apply their knowledge and develop their competency in reflecting on ethical questions.

The following tables further describe the knowledge to be acquired for each compulsory theme in the ethics component. Students acquire this knowledge in order to identify a situation from an ethical point of view, to examine a few references that support and enrich their reflection and to evaluate various options or possible actions. This knowledge is dealt with in learning and evaluation situations that incorporate the practice of dialogue while proposing increasingly complex contexts during a cycle and from one cycle to the next.

Demonstrates an understanding of the phenomenon of religion
Engages in dialogue

Knowledge related to ethics themes

Student constructs knowledge with teacher guidance.

Student applies knowledge by the end of the school year.

 

Student reinvests knowledge.

Elementary
Cycle
One
Cycle
Two
Cycle
Three
  1. The needs of humans and other living beings1
1 2 3 4 5 6
  1. Names the elements that contribute to the unique character of each human being (e.g. personal history, preferences, talents, physical characteristics)
       
  1. Names the needs shared by plants, animals and human beings (e.g. need for food)
       
  1. Names the needs that are not shared by plants, animals and human beings (e.g. human being's need for clothing, in contrast to animals and plants)
       
  1. Gives examples of actions illustrating that living beings need each other (e.g. the farmer grows the vegetables I eat)
       
  1. Gives examples of actions illustrating that the members of a family need each other (e.g. children need parents to give them shelter; parents need their children to cooperate to create a pleasant living environment)
       
  1. Demands associated with the interdependence of humans and other living beings2
1re 2e 3e 4e 5e 6e
  1. Names the responsibilities that different family members may assume (e.g. parents are responsible for feeding their children; a child might be responsible for walking the dog)
       
  1. Names the responsibilities that different people at school may assume (e.g. a student is responsible for cleaning the board; the principal organizes parent-teacher meetings; the secretary records absences)
       
  1. Names the values that guide behaviour in families and at school (e.g. sharing, attention to others, safety, respect)
       
  1. Names the norms that guide behaviour in families and at school (e.g. bedtime, rules of conduct in class)
       
  1. Gives examples of actions that may foster the well-being of living beings (e.g. consoling a friend, sharing toys, feeding a pet)
       
  1. Gives examples of actions that can harm living beings (e.g. saying hurtful things, hitting an animal, ripping a plant out of the soil)
       
  1. Names people or groups who take action to protect living beings (e.g. police officers, school crossing guards, Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals)
       
  1. Interpersonal relationships in groups3
1re 2e 3e 4e 5e 6e
  1. Names the groups to which people belong4 (e.g. family, class, friends, sports team, drama group, choir)
       
  1. Makes connections between belonging to a group or groups and the development of personal identity (e.g. influence of a group of friends on musical tastes, influence of family on recreational activities, belonging to a scout troop and the ability to survive in a forest)
       
  1. Gives examples of situations where needs are met in a group (e.g. by celebrating my birthday, my friends and my family meet my need to be loved and be recognized)
       
  1. Gives examples of situations illustrating the advantages of group life (e.g. through the cooperation and solidarity of all students in the school, the school yard cleanup was done quickly and everyone had more time to play)
       
  1. Gives examples of situations illustrating the disadvantages of group life (e.g. since many students want to play on the play structure, they all have to be patient and wait their turn, make compromises and learn to share the space)
       
  1. Names various types of relationships that can exist among the members of a group (e.g. friendship, leadership and conflictual relationships can exist among classmates)
       
  1. Explains how interpersonal relationships can contribute to or detract from the personal development of group members (e.g. when the captain of a team encourages the players, the players feel appreciated and this reinforces their self-esteem; a player who feels rejected by the members of his/her team loses self-confidence)
       
  1. Demands of belonging to a group5
1re 2e 3e 4e 5e 6e
  1. Explains how behaviours, attitudes or actions can foster group life (e.g. by adopting a calm attitude in class, everyone contributes to creating a pleasant atmosphere conducive to work, and the whole group benefits)
       
  1. Explains how behaviours, attitudes or actions can detract from group life (e.g. insulting a friend, or talking behind his/her back creates tension in the group and can cause conflicts)
       
  1. Explains how values guide group life (e.g. the value of respect encourages students to wait their turn to speak and allows everyone to express an opinion without being interrupted)
       
  1. Explains how norms guide group life (e.g. in karate classes, the teacher asks everyone to change teammates on a regular basis to avoid creating subgroups)
       
  1. Gives examples of situations in which values or norms can be questioned, modified or improved to foster community life (e.g. although keeping a secret is usually a good idea, sometimes, to help a friend, a secret should be revealed to an adult)
       
  1. Names the roles and responsibilities that members of a group may assume (e.g. in a drama group, all actors have to memorize their parts)
       
  1. Names the conditions that foster the personal well-being of the members of a group (e.g. sharing material in the classroom, establishing a conflict-management procedure)
       
  1. Individuals as members of society6
1re 2e 3e 4e 5e 6e
  1. Explains how members of a society influence each other (e.g. more and more people use reusable grocery bags, which creates a ripple effect)
       
  1. Gives examples of situations in which the influence of members of a society has an impact on self-assertiveness (e.g. a student refuses or decides to wear an article of clothing widely advertised in the media and worn by many friends)
       
  1. Explains how differences among individuals can be a source of enrichment (e.g. writing to a pen pal in another country can lead to enriching discoveries: music, recipes, values, ways of life)
       
  1. Explains how the differences among individuals can be a source of conflict (e.g. the competitive spirit can create conflict with those who only value participation; when people do not speak the same language, they may not always understand each other very well)
       
  1. Gives examples of prejudices, generalizations or stereotypes that are present in society (Prejudice: he is certainly the one who did it because he is the leader of his group; Generalization: my neighbour likes hunting, therefore all men like this activity; Stereotype: children who come from this neighbourhood are more intelligent than children from other neighbourhoods)
       
  1. Names the possible effects of prejudices, generalizations and stereotypes (e.g. there could be discrimination, rejection, injustice, categoriz­ation)
       
  1. Demands of life in society7
1re 2e 3e 4e 5e 6e
  1. Indicates what distinguishes an acceptable action from an unacceptable action (e.g. does an action result in prejudice, harm, discomfort or injustice?)
       
  1. Explains how actions or attitudes can foster life in society (e.g. denouncing an individual caught in the act of theft contributes to neighbourhood safety)
       
  1. Explains how actions and attitudes can detract from life in society (e.g. vandalism gives rise to costs that all citizens have to pay)
       
  1. Names sources of tension or conflict in society (e.g. discrimination, different interpretations of a rule, social inequalities)
       
  1. Explains how actions and attitudes can reduce tensions or conflicts in society (e.g. tensions between motorists and cyclists can be reduced if everyone abides by road safety rules and signals their intentions)
       
  1. Explains how values or norms guide life in society (e.g. the value "saving the environment" encourages reduced consump­tion of drinking water; the classification system for video games guides parents and children in their choices)
       
  1. Names the possible connections between a right and a responsibility (e.g. the right to borrow a book at the library and the responsibility for taking care of it; the right to use a municipal park and the responsibility for behaving like a good citizen)
       
  1. Learning common to all themes at the elementary level
1re 2e 3e 4e 5e 6e
  1. Names references that support and enrich ethical reflection (e.g. charters, laws, regulations, spiritual leaders, media)
  1. Reformulates ethical questions (e.g. what distinguishes a need from a want?)
       
  1. Formulates ethical questions (e.g. what is a just society, what does "being equal" mean?)
   

Demonstrates an understanding of the phenomenon of religion
Engages in dialogue

1.  Ethics and Religious Culture Program, Elementary Education, p. 335
2.  Ethics and Religious Culture Program, Elementary Education, p. 336
3.  Ethics and Religious Culture Program, Elementary Education, p. 337
4.  This is a reminder of learning achieved in Elementary Cycle One, Geography, History and Citizenship Education.
5.  Ethics and Religious Culture Program, Elementary Education, p. 338
6.  Ethics and Religious Culture Program, Elementary Education, p. 339
7.  Ethics and Religious Culture Program, Elementary Education, p. 340

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