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English Language Arts

Text Types, Structures and Features

Self-Expressive Text Types

Self-expressive texts allow us to participate in the life of family, friends and community. The complexity of a self-expressive text is achieved through the way its structures and features interact to create meaning(s). For this reason, the progression that students demonstrate in working with knowledge about how self-expressive texts are constructed is directly related to the increasing sophistication of concepts, themes and social knowledge in the texts that they interpret, write and produce.

In the Elementary English Language Arts program, self-expressive texts fall into the following categories:

  • Texts that reinforce and maintain relationships with others
  • Reflective texts that help us to reflect on, think and wonder about life, current events and personal experiences, as well as to reflect on our actions and evaluate what we learn.

Narrative and Literary Text Types
Information-Based Text Types

Student constructs knowledge with teacher guidance.

Student applies knowledge by the end of the school year.

 

Student reinvests knowledge.

Elementary
Cycle
One
Cycle
Two
Cycle
Three
  1. Texts That Reinforce or Maintain Relationships With Others
1 2 3 4 5 6
  1. Required Text Types
    1. Speaking
      1. Formal and informal thank-yous, expressions of appreciation and support
   
      1. Formal and informal introduction (e.g. of a guest speaker)
   
    1. Reading, Listening, Writing & Media Production
      1. Thank-you notes
       
      1. Invitations
       
      1. Greeting cards
       
      1. Friendly letters
       
      1. Poetry of different kinds written by and for children (e.g. free verse, list poems, rap, shape poems, free verse)
   
  1. Structures and Features

    The student understands the purpose of the following structures and features and uses this knowledge when reading, writing and producing own or others’ texts.

    1. Reading, Writing and Media Production
      1. Salutation, body and closing in a friendly letter
       
      1. Relevant details such as time, place and location in an invitation
       
      1. Suitable message, given the communication context, in thank-you notes and greeting cards
       
      1. Images (photo or drawing) to respond to the reader’s expectations and/or needs (e.g. the illustration on a thank-you note or invitation)
     
      1. Self expressive language to relate ideas, feelings, experiences (e.g. in own poetry)
 
      1. Self-expressive language in poetry: line breaks or stanzas, images, figurative language to create vivid pictures
 
  1. Reflective Texts
1 2 3 4 5 6
  1. Required Text Types
    1. Speaking
      1. Texts that focus on reflecting and evaluating own learning, in reading/ writing/ production conferences, including sharing of Integrated Portfolio
 
    1. Writing and Media Production
      1. Journals
     
      1. Multimedia journals
     
  1. Structures and Features
    The student understands the purpose of the following structures and features and uses this knowledge when reading and writing/producing texts.
    1. Writing and Media Production
      1. Self-expressive language to relate ideas, feelings, experience
   
      1. Word choice to indicate a specific time frame (e.g. past tense to indicate a memory)
   
      1. Synthesis of ideas and feelings to focus on what is most important

Narrative and Literary Text Types
Information-Based Text Types

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